Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
Bioécologie

Articles avec #materiels et methodes

ERICA Assessment Tool

28 Juin 2016,

Publié par Bioécologie

The ERICA Tool is a software system that has a structure based upon the tiered ERICA Integrated Approach to assessing the radiological risk to terrestrial, freshwater and marine biota. The Tool guides the user through the assessment process, recording information and decisions and allowing the necessary calculations to be performed to estimate risks to selected animals and plants.

More information here

ERICA Assessment Tool

Fly Pushing: The Theory and Practice of Drosophila Genetics

15 Juin 2016,

Publié par Bioécologie

A second edition of the classic handbook has become a standard in the Drosophila field. This edition is expanded to include topics in which classical genetic strategies have been augmented with new molecular tools. Included are such new techniques as homologous recombination, RNAi, new mapping techniques, and new mosaic marking techniques.

Fly Pushing: The Theory and Practice of Drosophila Genetics

Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP)

11 Juin 2016,

Publié par Bioécologie

Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP)

The Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a population consisting of more than 200 inbred lines derived from the Raleigh, USA population. The DGRP is a living library of common polymorphisms affecting complex traits, and a community resource for whole genome association mapping of quantitative trait loci.

The aquatic-terrestrial model ecosystem – a possibility to integrate riparian food webs in stream mesocosm testing

27 Février 2016,

Publié par JMB

In this post, Matthias Wieczorek informs about their recent paper on the use of an aquatic-terrestrial model ecosystem to study cross-ecosystem effects of contaminants.

The scientific background

Emerging aquatic insects provide an important food source for predatory species in riparian food webs. If these aquatic insects are exposed to contaminants during their aquatic life stage, they may transport contaminants to riparian ecosystems during their emergence. Therefore, riparian food webs may be at risk from either an aquatic-terrestrial transfer of contaminants or from contaminant-driven reductions of emerging aquatic biomass. The objective of the present study was to develop an aquatic-terrestrial model ecosystem enabling the possibility to investigate such cross-ecosystem effects on a mesocosm scale under controlled conditions.

Read more here

The stream mesocosm facility at the Campus Landau (photo by M. Wieczorek)

The stream mesocosm facility at the Campus Landau (photo by M. Wieczorek)

Laboratory for Experimental Ecology and Evolution

16 Octobre 2015,

Publié par Bioécologie

The Laboratory for Experimental Ecology and Evolution (LE3) (McGill University, Canada) is a unique integrated facility that will deliver powerful new systems to address fundamental issues of great scientific, social and economic concern. The technological core of the proposal is the application of highly automated robotic systems to experiments in ecology and evolution. The robotic systems of LE3 will allow us to handle far more lines and to transfer them more rapidly and precisely than has been possible before, making it practicable to emulate long-term, large-scale phenomena. LE3 is planned as an integrated facility used by several existing research groups. It is not merely the expansion of individual labs, but a genuinely cooperative venture that is specifically intended to create and support new research collaborations. The experiments that we propose often involve a constellation of skills and techniques, ranging from controlled environment design to low-metal technology, and from foodweb analysis to genomics. Most are beyond the capacity of any single laboratory, and can be tackled only within a facility like LE3. The research that LE3 will make possible not only builds on the strength of existing programs, but will enable them to be combined and extended so that qualitatively different kinds of experiment become practicable.

More information here

Wildlife camera trapping: a review and recommendations for linking surveys to ecological processes

24 Mars 2015,

Publié par Bioécologie

Authors:

A.Cole Burton, Eric Neilson, Dario Moreira, Andrew Ladle, Robin Steenweg, Jason T. Fisher, Erin Bayne and Stan Boutin

Accepted manuscript online: 21 MAR 2015 09:12AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.12432 -Journal of Applied Ecology

Summary

1.Reliable assessment of animal populations is a long-standing challenge in wildlife ecology. Technological advances have led to widespread adoption of camera traps (CTs) to survey wildlife distribution, abundance, and behaviour. As for any wildlife survey method, camera trapping must contend with sources of sampling error such as imperfect detection. Early applications focused on density estimation of naturally marked species, but there is growing interest in broad-scale CT surveys of unmarked populations and communities. Nevertheless, inferences based on detection indices are controversial and the suitability of alternatives such as occupancy estimation is debatable.

2.We reviewed 266 CT studies published between 2008 and 2013. We recorded study objectives and methodologies, evaluating the consistency of CT protocols and sampling designs, the extent to which CT surveys considered sampling error, and the linkages between analytical assumptions and species ecology.

3.Nearly two-thirds of studies surveyed more than one species, and a majority used response variables that ignored imperfect detection (e.g. presence–absence, relative abundance). Many studies used opportunistic sampling and did not explicitly report details of sampling design and camera deployment that could affect conclusions.

4.Most studies estimating density used capture-recapture methods on marked species, with spatially explicit methods becoming more prominent. Few studies estimated density for unmarked species, focusing instead on occupancy modelling or measures of relative abundance. While occupancy studies estimated detectability, most did not explicitly define key components of the modelling framework (e.g. a site), or discuss potential violations of model assumptions (e.g. site closure). Studies using relative abundance relied on assumptions of equal detectability, and most did not explicitly define expected relationships between measured responses and underlying ecological processes (e.g. animal abundance and movement).

5.Synthesis and applications. The rapid adoption of camera traps represents an exciting transition in wildlife survey methodology. We remain optimistic about the technology's promise, but call for more explicit consideration of underlying processes of animal abundance, movement, and detection by cameras, including more thorough reporting of methodological details and assumptions. Such transparency will facilitate efforts to evaluate and improve the reliability of camera trap surveys, ultimately leading to stronger inferences and helping to meet modern needs for effective ecological inquiry and biodiversity monitoring.